Church Etiquette: Lesson 3

The things that Miss Manners Left Out ...

Hmmm, what to wear...?

Remember the time when people wore their "Sunday best" to go to church? In fact, dress clothes were often referred to as Sunday clothes. In some parts of the country, this is not common today. This does not mean that the church provides an opportunity for a fashion show, but dress in church has become way too casual.

We should offer Christ our "Sunday best," not our everyday or common wear. We should dress modestly, not in a flashy way that draws attention to ourselves. Our dress should always be becoming of a Christian - especially at church.

Would you wear this to Church?

Here are some specific guidelines that are used today - 

Children: Only young children (under 10 yrs. old) should wear shorts to church and only dress-shorts. Athletic shorts, jeans, shorts, cut-offs, or any spandex are never appropriate in the church (for children or adults!) Shoes or sandals should be clean and tied. No one should wear T-shirts of any kind (especially if they promote questionable advertising, e.g., rock groups, beer ads, sports teams, etc.).

Women: Dresses should be modest. No tank tops ( or dresses with spaghetti straps), shoulders should be covered at all times; no shorts skirts or mini skirts, no skin-tight clothing. Dresses or tops should not low cut (in the front or the back). If women wear pants in church, they should wear dress pants ( not jeans, leggings, etc.). Shorts of any type are never appropriate for church. While head coverings are not necessary, some communities require women to wear scarves or some head coverings.

Men: Men should also dress modestly. While coat and tie are not mandatory, shirts should have collars and be buttoned up (the actual collar button may be left undone, but two or three buttons undone is inappropriate). Pants should be clean and neat. Blue (black or colored) jeans (especially ones with holes or patches) are too casual for the church. Again shorts are NOT appropriate church wear.

Shoes: Dress shoes are most appropriate. Clean tennis shoes and sandals are also OK. Flip-flops and other beach type footwear is too casual and should not be worn in church.

If you are going someplace after church, you need to dress casually, bring a change of clothing with you, and change after fellowship time.

Remember to use your best judgment and good taste when dressing for church. After all, you don't go to be seen by everyone else (or do you?), but you go to meet and worship God.

Posture everyone, posture...

Since the American churches have largely adopted pews or chairs, sitting during the service has become acceptable. However, when we sit, do we realize that we are also sending a message to God? When seated, we should have both feet on the floor and our backs against the back of the chair. There should never be any slouching or crossing of legs at any time.

In some Orthodox cultures, crossing one's legs is taboo and considered to be very disrespectful. Also, it is bad for those with compromised low extremity circulation. In our American culture, while there are no real taboos concerning crossing one's legs, we tend to cross our legs to get comfortable when sitting. We should not cross our legs in the church because it is "wrong," but rather because it is too casual and too relaxed for being in church.

Think about it - when you get settled in your favorite chair at home, you often lean back, cross your legs, and let your mind wander where it may. Remember that sitting in church is a concession and a privilege; it is not the normative prayer method. You surely don't want your mind to wander off too much. In fact, if you do sit, you should sit attentively with feet on the floor, ready to stand at attention (which is what “Let us attend” means). Cross yourself with your fingers and hand when in church, NOT with your legs!

Also, when standing, you should be standing with your back straight (or as straight as possible and with your hands at your sides, not in your pockets or with your arms crossed like "I dream of Jeannie" or your hands on your hips – this is considered disrespectful and rude.

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